Concealed Online – 5 Best Hiding Places to Stash A Gun

Stow away IN PLAIN SIGHT

Group concealedonline.com realizes that individual protection begins with EASY ACCESS to your gun.

Regardless of whether lashed to your hip…

… or reserved under a heap of clothing…

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… GETTING TO YOUR GUN WHEN YOU NEED IT is the place the famous elastic meets the street!

Here’s our main 5 rundown of most loved gun stash destinations:

[WARNING: in the event that you have children at home, be additional touchy to the potential repercussions of each]

1 – BEDSIDE MANNER

In case you’re at home and need to react to a thief or home attack situation, nine times out of ten you’ll be sleeping, level on your back, half-snoozing. That is the point at which a bed outline holster truly proves to be useful.

The better ones slip pleasantly amongst bedding and box spring and stay put. Flexible holster ties in addition to versatile pockets for mags or a little electric lamp finish this very suggested preparation group.

2 – UP, UP AND (TUCKED) AWAY

Keep in mind that stunning erased scene in BLADE RUNNER (the first, not the crappy new one) where Deckard and Gaff look through Leon’s (Brion James) condo? After the two Blade Runner’s abandon, it’s uncovered that Leon had been dangling from the washroom roof the entire time!

Virtuoso concealing spot!

Hang your firearm topsy turvy from a snare over the entryway appropriate inside a storeroom. A robber may experience your garments and other storage room stuff, however THEY WON’T LOOK STRAIGHT UP!

3 – THE SUNKEN PLACE

A criminal will be excessively bustling scouring dresser drawers, storerooms and so forth to waste time with what — at first look, in any event — gives off an impression of being just a harmless heap of messy clothing.

We suggest putting socks or clothing or anything remotely squalid looking appropriate ON TOP of the heap to truly prevent awful folks from being enticed to look through your home of nasties!

Also, if, similar to me, you’re somewhat of a germaphobe — you may even need to consider first reserving your handgun inside a plastic sack before covering it underneath a grimy heap! Exceptionally suggested!

4 – D.W.C.

In case you’re D.W.C. — Driving While Carrying — achieving your handgun without LOOKING LIKE you’re going after your handgun is critical!

Clearly, glove compartments are absolutely out! Armrests aren’t vastly improved.

Rather, a viable option includes utilizing your seat cover as disguise.

Split the crease on the back of the traveler’s seat cover (closest to the driver), embed a conservative holster/handgun combo, and voila!

Carjacker’s be careful!

5 – PLANTERS (NO PEANUTS)

Affirm, I let it out. I cherish plants and have an arrangement of greenery spread all through my home.

Here’s the thing about plants. They make extraordinary improving touches, they’re incredible for nature, and (alright, I let it be known) they’re decent to converse with (they don’t argue!).

What’s more, over all that — they’re ideal for reserving a handgun on display, particularly since they offer the advantage of implicit disguise!

So there you have it — our most loved spots to hide guns at home or out and about!

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Concealed Online Reviews – Every Breath You Take – Breath Control While Shooting

TO BREATHE OR NOT TO BREATHE
Stating the obvious here but — breathing is important!

But it’s even more important if you find yourself caught up in a real life or death situation where your health depends on hitting what you’re aiming at! Remember, when your life is on the line, your breathing becomes more erratic, making it all the more important to know how to manage it.

Which is why team concealedonline.com is going to shine a light on best breathing practices for shooters.

DON’T FORGET TO BREATHE
You’ve probably heard how elite marksmen are able to pull the trigger in-between heartbeats. Definitely cool for experts, but definitely NOT something we recommend you attempt.

Okay, let’s get real…

Breathing is a natural body motion and can help or hinder your aim. I mean, the whole point of breath control is to make sure your sights are on the mark when you pull the trigger, right?

So it logically follows that controlled breathing can make all the difference in accuracy. When you breathe your chest rises and falls. This movement can cause your gun barrel to drift off-target.

Bottom line: breathing at the wrong time may cause you to move at the exact moment you pull the trigger. Not good.

When you’ve run out of options and you have no other choice left but to draw your concealed carry weapon, your heart rate will accelerate. Your breathing will become more rapid and harder to control.

So what do you do when you’re under this kind of pressure?

First off — don’t panic.

Second, practice these 3 easy-to-remember breathing techniques. One of them will definitely be better for you than another, so try them all out to see which one fits you best.

TAKE A BREATHER
Half exhale/pause – when you’re ready to fire your weapon, take in a deep breath. Exhale about half of the air out of your lungs, pause briefly and pull the trigger. This is known as “respiratory pause” and helps you maintain aim. The pause allows you to hold your barrel and sights in perfect alignment on target as the gun fires.

Half inhale/pause –- relax, steady your breathing, inhale. When your lungs are about half full, pause and pull the trigger. The inhale and pause is similar to the exhale and pause option above.

Complete exhale/no pause – –steady your breathing, do a full exhale, pause when your lungs are empty and squeeze the trigger. But keep in mind, a pause is not the same as holding your breath. If you do that, your muscles will seize up and your BPM will change and your shot accuracy will be compromised.

BREATHE EASY
Last thing — make sure to always chill and slow down as much as possible so you can steady your breathing. This will reduce body movement that throws you off target. Even better, if you can — step back, deep breathe in, deep breathe out, and then reacquire your target.

Of course, in life or death situations, this last option IS NOT an option.

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How To Carry Concealed On A Motorcycle

Team concealedonline.com is always ready to ride! But first, let’s go over some simple tips and tricks for carrying concealed while straddling your favorite bike.
Because that’s how we roll people!

STATE LAW – KNOW IT

Every state’s firearm laws are different, so until there’s a uniform nationwide set of CCW rules and regulations, you need to be aware of each state’s laws when traveling with a firearm.
If you want to avoid prison or huge fines/legal fees, do your homework! Google it. Spend your time riding instead of doing time behind bars because you didn’t bother to follow state rules.
A few states require no permit to conceal or open carry. Others are reciprocal, which means your state’s concealed carry permit is recognized by other states. Still other states either don’t allow you to obtain CCW permits at all or make it a really tough slog.
When it comes to carrying while riding, the devil is in the details. In Missouri for instance, any state resident who legally owns a firearm can carry a loaded gun in their vehicle either out in the open or concealed in the vehicle or even on their person. That said, you cannot legally get out of your car carrying a concealed firearm unless you have a CCW permit.
The same laws apply to motorcycles in that state. You can legally carry a concealed firearm while on your motorcycle, but if you get off your bike you have to secure it on your motorcycle! Weird, right?!
And there are states that require you to secure your firearm in a lockable case, so be sure to have a lockable hard-sided gun case onboard your ride.

Lastly, when planning a lengthy motorcycle trip that will take you through several states, we highly recommend you print out a cheat sheet which lists motorcycle laws by state.  Keep it handy so you can review it at a fuel stop or rest area before entering each new state.

THINK AHEAD

One good rule of thumb is to carry while riding the same way you would carry when NOT riding.
So before leaving home, select which firearm to carry depending on the set of circumstances you will be dealing with on that particular day. For example, if you’re going somewhere that has metal detectors, you might want to seriously reconsider carrying.
If you’re running errands or doing a coffee run, it’s probably a good idea to carry a smaller caliber gun that’s compact enough to stick in your front pants pocket or, preferably, use a small pocket holster. It’s always better to use a holster instead of sticking your gun in your pocket to cut down on imprinting.
Another thing to take into consideration is public comfort level. Some people get freaked out when they see someone other than a police officer carrying a gun. In that case, they may wind up dialing 911.
Needless to say, this could lead to awkward and/or unnecessary confrontations with law enforcement and is one of the key reasons it’s always best to conceal carry where it’s also legal to open carry.

FASHION CONSCIOUSNESS

Risk levels rise when carrying while traveling. Wearing versatile underclothing that is comfortable will help you to always have your firearm at your side without the fit issues and comfort restrictions from standard holsters.
Everyday shirts or leathers can be worn over sleeveless T’s with compression fit, designed for ease of drawing your gun (i.e. they’re not bulky or constricting). There are apparel lines that specialize in this fashion wear, featuring an elastic holster that attaches to the shirt under the armpit with Velcro. You can wear it under any button-up shirt, vest, or your favorite Harley jacket. Check ’em out online.

A FEW FINAL CONSIDERATIONS

If you’re right handed, normally you’ll carry on your left side. But when riding, you might want to switch it up. That way, you can draw using your left without taking your hand off the throttle.

If you pull off the road to grab a bite, you may elect not to carry when going inside a restaurant. If so, you should always secure a firearm in your windshield or tank bag (compact guns) or you can fit larger handguns in your saddlebag. Wherever you ultimately decide to carry, practice retrieving your weapon as quickly as possible so it becomes second nature should you need it.

When planning a lengthy motorcycle trip which goes through several states, print out a motorcycle laws by state “cheat sheet,” which you can keep in my windshield bag. This way, you can look at it at a fuel stop or rest area before entering a new state so you’re fully apprised of rules and regulations.

One In the Chamber – How To Be Ready For Anything

Safety AND Speed

These 2 are NOT mutually exclusive.

You CAN practice gun safety while NOT compromising on a speedy response to a self-defense situation.

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At concealedonline.com we get questions all the time about this topic. Like, is it cool to carry my concealed handgun with a round in the chamber?
Every Bullet Counts

What’s the point of carry concealed if you’re not READY to react should the need arise?

And part of that readiness is the ability to lay down effective fire.

So the short answer is, YES – one in the chamber is recommended.
How messed up would it be to draw your weapon and have to struggle to rack the slide to chamber a round???

Your stress levels will already be peaking under these conditions. Wouldn’t it ALSO suck if you forgot that you DIDN’T have a bullet ready to go?

Of course, there are those naysayers who point out the safety issues that may arise, especially if your weapon of choice doesn’t have an external safety. But bottom line – the only way a gun fires is if you pull the trigger.

Trigger Happy

Concealed carriers should always make sure their holster covers the trigger guard and nothing gets in the way of your weapon being re-holstered.

Any obstruction could lead to disaster.
If you’re still concerned about keeping a round in the chamber without an external safety on your gun, you might want to consider training yourself to get in the habit of chambering a round EVERY TIME you draw.

Chances Are

Hopefully you will never have to use your concealed carry weapon, but there’s no guarantee either way.

Should a situation arise where you DO have to draw your weapon, being prepared to meet the challenge with an IMMEDIATE RESPONSE is preferable.

Otherwise, why bother to carry concealed in the first place? Lack of preparation defeats the whole point.

Look at it like this: you don’t buy insurance and know you’re going to need it.

But you still buy insurance just in case.

Concealed Online Reviews – End the Debate: Revolver or Semi-Auto? Which Works Better for Concealed Carry?

There are 15 people right now at your local gun shop. Step in and ask them if you should concealed carry with a revolver or a semi-auto and you’ll get 15 different opinions.

Well here’s another opinion for you: To end the revolver vs. semi-auto debate, you need to consider your concealed carry needs, your shooting style, and a few other factors those 15 guys at your local range aren’t even thinking about.

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Sure, there are already 1,000 opinions out there on forums, blogs, and in magazines…

Isn’t it time to analyze your style, needs, and goals and come up with your own opinion? Keep reading to learn more…

Let’s Talk Reliability and Concealed Carry

If you’ve been reading about revolvers already you’ve heard quite a bit about “second strike capability.”

So, if you’re firing a revolver and you have a misfire, you can just pull the trigger again.

Revolvers allow you to make this second strike. Your trigger pull advances the next cartridge.

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Die-hard proponents of revolvers for concealed carry will tell you “semi-automatics don’t have second strike capability.” You know what? It’s true. A few semi-automatics allow you to pull the trigger again to re-strike the same cartridge…but that’s not even the same, is it?

But here’s the thing…

You’re going to have to look hard to find a pistol you’re willing to actually buy for concealed carry that you can’t rely on.

Think about it! Out of all the brands you’ve been looking at…

Revolvers, semi-autos, Smith & Wesson, Glock, Taurus, Colt, the list goes on…

There are few pistols from major manufacturers available today that you can call “unreliable.”

On top of that, when  loaded with the ammo you’ll use in a life-or-death situation (that’s right, the premium stuff, not low-quality home-reloaded from the hobbyist down the street with second-rate powder), you’re very unlikely to experience failure.

When you pull the trigger, it’s likely your premium self-defense ammo will fire in any modern pistol. “Second strike capable” or not, reliability in this regard is a wash.

Now what’s out of the way, let’s talk about what’s really important…

Think Recoil, Not Reliability

So you pick a revolver because of reliability…

Now you have something else to face: Recoil.

When you fire a revolver, the hammer drops, the bullet leaves the barrel and nothing else moves. All of the force from the bullet you just fired needs to go somewhere. And it heads right back into your hands.

Heavy revolvers help reduce this recoil. Most of the revolvers you’ll concealed carry don’t (simply because they are smaller and lighter).

Semi-autos are built to dissipate the force of a bulleting being fired.

Some of the force from every bullet leaving the chamber is used to move the slide back. Pressure bleeds off and moves the barrel. The motion of the gun itself and the design of semi-automatics draw away the force and pressure of firing your pistol.

What does this mean?

Pick a caliber and a pistol weight and a semi-auto will feel like it recoils less.

When seconds matter and help is minutes away, you’ll want less recoil to keep your rounds on target.

Capacity is Another Consideration

This one is short…

You can fit more rounds in most semi-automatics.

Higher capacity without reloading (and faster reloading time) is paramount to nearly everything else in life or death situations.

You’ll be trained to carry concealed, you’ll be prepared to fire (hopefully), and even then, in most “must shoot situations” not all of your rounds will make it to target.

Studies show that most of the time simply having a weapon, firing a single round, and hitting your target just once will protect you and your family. Armed assiliants are rarely prepared for bystanders who are carrying concealed.

But at the end of the day would you rather be prepared to reload quickly? Armed with a magazine of 10 rounds you can reload in under 2 seconds? Or do you want to fire 5 or 6 and end up stuck reloading a revolver?

But What About Complexity?

Revolvers are easier to fire.

They are simple, with no-frills operation.

Put rounds in, close the cylinder, pull the trigger. Rinse and repeat.

Semi-automatic pistols have more steps. Insert mag, rack the slide, safety, shoot…

Revolver fans love simplicity. There’s less to go wrong and (importantly for some) fewer steps to “learn.”

But if you’re carrying concealed, you’re going to be training anyway, right?

How Do You Choose?

Here’s the bottom line…

Semi-Automatics give you more rounds, less recoil, and improved reloading time. Do you need to worry about duds and second strike capability? Maybe.

Deputy Sheriff Bob Beanblossom, rangemaster, gives instruction during the shooting portion of the Tipton Co. Handgun Permit class on March 30, 2013.

Are revolvers easier to operate? You bet.

At the end of the day you need to choose the concealed carry pistol YOU feel most comfortable with. That’s how we can all end the revolver vs. semi-auto debate.

Concealed Carry Training: Does Immersion Training Create Better Shooters?

There are only two primary types of firearms training: Episodic or Immersion training.

Deciding which training style will work best for you and your goals is the first step you should take before applying for a concealed carry permit. During the many state application processes, you’ll need to discuss your training, philosophy, and the approach you’ll take to hone your shooting skills.

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You can choose either type, but we wanted to ask: Does one style of training produce better shooters?

Can You Learn On Your Own? Episodic Concealed Carry Training Explained  

Episodic training is often self-directed.

You’ll learn from training videos, text, online shooting courses, or even online concealed carry classes. Then, once you’re on the range, you’ll apply what you’ve learned while shooting.

If you can subjectively monitor your form and critically judge your performance, episodic training may be for you.

Unfortunately, it’s often difficult to analyze your own performance.

One of the traps you fall into if you decide on episodic training without instructor supervision is failing to learn new information or forgetting to reinforce basic fundamentals.

traning hand gun

When you learn and shoot on your own, it’s easy to “fall into a rut,” plateau, and develop difficult to overcome bad habits. This is the reason why many shooters and instructors believe immersion training is much more effective.

Does Immersion Training Really Build Better Shooters?

Immersion training has multiple benefits over self-directed or even instructor-based episodic shooting.

Normally, immersion training takes place over an entire day or multiple days and you’ll work aggressively on your skills under the supervision of an instructor who closely watches your technique and form.

Immersion training keeps you from falling into bad habits, forces you to constantly focus on proper form, and pushes you to progress faster.

Fast progress under the watchful eye of a certified instructor is one of the reasons many states require concealed carry courses before you can even file an application.

In Just 12 Hours You Can Rapidly Progress as a Shooter…

But here’s the big problem with immersion training…

When you pile all of your training into a single day or a short 2-3 day span, you’re much more likely to forget everything you’ve learned.

Immersion training is great for learning new drills, techniques, and honing in on fundamentals, but one of the most important principles of practice for any skill is that short, more frequent sessions are much more effective than long sessions spread father apart.

So, What Type of Training is Better for Concealed Carry?

In my experience, you should always start with professional instruction before moving on to shooting on your own.

Usually this means beginning with an instructor at a one day or multi-day session before moving on to practice on your own several times a week. After a period of self-directed episodic practice to reinforce what you’ve learned, you go back to an immersive session.

But Immersion Training is Expensive and Time Consuming, Is There a Better Way?

To avoid the cost of immersive in-person training, you can find NRA-certified online concealed carry courses recognized by multiple states to meet the requirements to apply for a CCW.

Several online concealed carry classrooms allow you to receive direct feedback from instructors. You can actually upload shooting sessions and get guidance on what you’re doing right and wrong.

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This modern take on traditional training can be just as effective as in-person concealed carry training.

If you don’t have time for 12 hour per day immersion shooting sessions, you may want to consider working with certified shooting coaches and instructors online.