3 Beginner’s Tips For New Concealed Carriers

Got Your Back?  Always!

At concealedonline.com we never want our new concealed carry members to feel like they’ve been forgotten!

Which is why we’re offering these tips to make your life-enhancing transition from non-carry to concealed-carry a whole lot smoother.

Know Thy CCW, Know Thyself

There’s an old saying that “familiarity breeds contempt” …

… but in the case of those who carry a CCW, it’s just the opposite!

Become familiar with EVERY ASPECT of your concealed carry system, including your:

— weapon of choice

— ammo of choice

— holster of choice

— clothing of choice

— behavior of choice

First of all, you will probably never experience a situation so bad that you’ll feel compelled to draw your weapon.

Even so, it’s important to be prepared for a so-called worst-case-scenario… and that begins with being familiar with every little detail of your CCW system.

Choosing to concealed carry comes with responsibilities, like knowing how to use your weapon safely and how to actually keep it concealed.  So with that in mind, here’s our top 3 tips for beginners:

1 – Don’t Be So Obvious

If you act like you’re carrying a gun, then expect others to know you’re carrying too!

Chill. Don’t act weird. Don’t act nervous.

Don’t act like you have a gun strapped to your hip.

Stop messing with your shirt. Stop fidgeting. Stop obsessing.

No one has x-ray vision. Strangers can’t see the gun under your shirt.

No one can read your mind, which, often in the case of beginners, goes something like this…

“…oh man, WHY is that guy looking at me?”  “… stop looking at me!” “…how does he KNOW I’m carrying???”

As long as you’re obeying the law, you’re cool.

2 – Rehearse At Home Before Going Out in Public

Take your gun/holster combo for a test run in the privacy of your own abode before you assume everything works in the public sphere.

Bend.

Sit.

Jump (especially if you carry concealed at your local sports bar)!

Stretch.

Hug.

Become intimately aware of how you look and feel doing these basic movements in public while carrying concealed.

Make sure there are no signs of “printing” — telltale gun bulges or outlines.

3 – Practice Makes Perfect

Make sure your CCW gear is ready for prime time before assuming it is.

Make sure you have tested it out and feel comfortable with it in public.

Preparedness is key to safety and survival.

For you AND for the public who are counting on you not to act like an idiot or become a loose cannon.

Remember, responsible gun ownership means using your weapon only as a last resort!

At concealedonline.com we know that if you choose to carry concealed, it is your responsibility to also make sure you have the right training, right mindset, and right legal requirements.

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Police praise concealed carry homeowner’s handling of confrontation with wanted man

This incident of a Concealed Carry Hero of America who took matters into his own hands caught our attention at concealedonline.com. Marysville, Washington police reported a homeowner who did everything right when he came face-to-face with a wanted criminal, putting his concealed carry permit to the test.
The homeowner, Joe Hemrich, said it took years of training to teach him how to stay calm in an otherwise scary situation.

“I swing the door open and say, hey! He turned and that’s when I said, put youConcealed Onliner hands in the air,” Hemrich said.

Hemrich suddenly found himself  staring straight into the eyes of a man with four warrants out for his arrest.

At the time, of course, Hemrich didn’t know that.

All he knew was the guy wielded a potentially lethal baton and was four feet away from his child’s bedroom window.

Hemrich said he’s heard the horror stories of what can happen in situations where homeowners confront criminals. Good Samaritans can wind up hurting others and Hemrich was determined not to be one of those people.

“You have to know how to use your gun. If not, you’re just a liability,” he stressed. “I carry a firearm to protect myself, my family, my community with the intentions of never having to use it.”

Surveillance video captured Hemrich walk the suspect at gunpoint to the front of his yard, ordering the man to the ground and holding him until police arrived.

“I could see there was a good-size knife sticking out the top of his backpack,” he said.

Hemrich noted that the entire altercation lasted about five minutes. It was the longest five minutes of his life.

Marysville police said Hemrich did everything right. Most importantly, he complied with officer’s commands when they arrived on scene.

Another happy ending for the concealed carry community that we at concealedonline.com are proud to report on!

3 Must-Have Accessories For Concealed Carry

So You Bought a Concealed Carry Gun. You’re all Set, Right? Nope!

Here at concealedonline.com we feel that — aside from proper training — you need some awesome accessories to make your CCW system effective in every situation.
Here’s our 3 favorite concealed carry accessories to optimize your self-defense and help you protect your loved ones. Each one will help you take your protection to the next level.

Concealed OnlineBELTS

This is where the rubber meets the road… the primary point of failure for most new concealed carriers. Which makes it the weakest potential link in the chain of things that absolutely have to work for CCW system effectiveness.

Most people just assume they’re going to wear the belt they already have, and some people wear no belt at all on a normal basis.

Not good.

The belt you wear while carrying concealed is one of the most important parts of carrying.

Why? Let’s break it down:

Stability – your belt provides an attachment point for the holster and also keeps the holster on a horizontal plane. Both of these are critical for keeping the gun stable.

Draw – a properly fastened and retentive belt keeps the holster attached when you draw. A too loose or too thin belt will flex and bend which could interfere with your draw.

A belt is critical to weapons retention, and is often the only thing holding your holster in your pants.

A good belt for concealed carrying can be made of either quality leather, or even synthetic nylon. Look for a solid buckle and wide belt as this offers more holster support.

MAG CARRIERS

Unless you’re a crack shot, you may need more rounds than you think. Having the option to reload is key to neutralizing bad guys.

Since you already have a belt and concealed holster, slim-fitting magazine carriers are a must-have.

Like your weapon, they can be discreetly disguised and the extra weight is negligible. Go with an open-top magazine carrier that allows you to grip it from the bottom and pull them straight up for a reload.

For revolvers, open-top speed loader pouches are effective, though they’re wider than comparable mag pouches.

But don’t forget – speed loaders or a magazine in your front pocket are a dead giveaway you’re carrying concealed.

Rule of thumb: always keep additional hardware as concealed as the weapon itself.

FLASHLIGHTS

Most concealed carry guns won’t be equipped with a weapons light. The whole rig is big and bulky and kind of defeats the purpose of carrying concealed.

Even so, the fact is, you still need tactical illumination since many of the places you carry are dimly lit.

Movie theaters, restaurants or the workplace can be challenged for proper lighting.

We recommend you always carry some form of flashlight. If a situation ever arises, you don’t want to rely on squinting to hit your target.

At concealedonline.com we strongly believe that a weapons system is more than just the weapon itself.

Accessories allow you more options and it’s better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it!

Concealed Online Reviews – How Concealed Carry Rights are Being Challenged by New Anti-NRA Group

When this story hit the headlines, the team at concealedonline.com reviews took notice.

Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg is heading up a new gun control group that will spend $25 million against “concealed carry reciprocity” efforts and pro-gun candidates during the 2018 midterms.

Called Everytown for Gun Safety, the group formed in 2014 with $50 million from Bloomberg to counteract the NRA. It plans on putting its money where its’ mouth is to take on federal and state-level lawmakers as well as advocacy efforts against “concealed carry reciprocity.”

That bill, introduced in Congress earlier this year, gives gun owners the right to abide only by the gun laws in their own state, even when they’re in possession of a firearm in another state with stricter laws.

Concealed Online Reviews - How Concealed Carry Rights are Being Challenged by New Anti-NRA Group

“THE NRA WANTS TO NORMALIZE CARRYING GUNS IN PUBLIC.”

Everytown president, John Feinblatt says: “This is a line in the sand on this issue, there’s no question about it. The NRA wants to normalize carrying guns in public. It’s not where the American public is.” “We’re putting people on notice today that we’re watching … and expect to hold people accountable.”

Hillary Clinton’s deputy director of state campaigns, Brynne Craig, and Eric Schultz, aide to President Barack Obama are expected to serve on the new group.

At concealedonline.com we feel it is our duty to keep you updated on all CCW related stories, but especially ones that could effect your Second Amendment rights!

Concealed Online Reviews – 5 Best Portable, Packable Pistols on the Planet!

Yep, we did it again! The overachieving team at concealedonline.com  have put together another awesome list featuring the most outstanding, compact, easy-to-conceal handguns on earth!

Here’s our 5 “best-of-the-best” choices:

1 – Ruger LCR

Revolvers are nothing new under the sun, but they’re still a credible carry for personal defense!

This top choice from the Ruger “Lightweight Carry Revolver” line features 5 revolving rounds of GTFA in an easy to access, snub-nose package. As wheel guns go, this mini-monster boasts our favorite stock trigger as well.

And if you’re really looking to get someone’s attention, load up some .357’s and look no further!

2 – GLOCK 43

Gnarly nines have a stylish new delivery system: the GLOCK 43!

Pristine and pocketable, these compact carries have been flying off the shelves since they first came to market. Affordable, lightweight, reliable – this one has it all.

Oh, and did we mention stopping power?! This little honey is as good as it gets in that department too!

3 – Smith & Wesson M&P Shield

Single stacks have met their match with The Smith & Wesson M&P Shield!

Devotees dig the sleek lines, slim fit, reliability, and doable price tag.

Plus a 7+1 capacity makes it a competitive choice, coupled of course with the optional frame-mounted safety that takes this portable package to the next level!

4 – Springfield XD-S 3.3

Okay, we gotta give it up for Springfield who deserves a little Croatian adulation for this popular, pocket peace-of-mind!

Available in .40 or 9mm, this EDC diminutive darling features a grip safety plus 7+1 capacity, all wrapped up neatly in less than a 1-inch wide package.

Lest we forget the fiber optic site, trusty trigger and nice price that won’t break the bank!

5 – Walther P99C AS

As far as compact, double-stack concealed carry guns go, this one is literally a dream come true!

For optimal performance, grip and feel, there’s just nothing out there that beats Walther’s underrated offering. Sporting one of the best stock triggers on any striker-fired gun, you can move this one to the very top of your list!

And talking about lists, that just about completes ours, folks!

Want more info on all-things concealed carry? Go to concealedonline.com  and have at it!

Choosing A Defensive Handgun-Part 1 | Concealed Onlne Reviews

Defensive Handgun -concelaed online

 

Let’s start with a few home truths:

  1. All Firearms can kill you period. People often conveniently overlook this fact when touting their favorite hand cannon.
  2. Only hits count in a gun fight. A hit with a .22 is 100% more effective than a miss with a .44 magnum.
  3. You have a better than 50% chance of surviving being shot with a Handgun. Handguns are notoriously inefficient at killing for several reasons. Low velocity, small munitions and difficulty in accurate shot placement under stress or without continuous proper training. Another factor is of course improvements in medical techniques, technology and response time. Given the option LE will reach for their Shotgun or Rifle as would most Military personnel.
  4. There is only one Best Handgun for Self-defense. It’s the Largest Caliber Handgun that Youcan :
  • Confidently
  • Safely
  • Quickly
  • Accurately
  • Place Multiple Hits on the Target

In order to find the handgun best suited to your defensive needs and capabilities there are several factors we need to consider. There are specific criteria for Concealed guns that do not apply to home defense guns and I will cover them separately at the end. Let’s start with some general guidelines.

  1. Fit and Ergonomics You must be able to grip the gun correctly and your finger should be able to correctly activate the trigger with that grip. You should be able to comfortably locate and manipulate all the guns controls. With Practice you can overcome minor deficiencies in fit and ergonomics, however if fit and ergonomics are seriously wrong you will not enjoy shooting the gun and therefore wont practice with it rendering it useless.
  2. Price and Budget. With handguns, like most things in life you get what you pay for. Prices range from around $200 – $3000+. What you should remember is that you are trusting your life to this gun, It will be in constant use so will incur wear and it has to be 100% reliable even in adverse conditions. Will that cheap gun fulfil those criteria? Probably not. But, if that is all you can afford it is better than no gun. At the other end of the scale do I want to subject my beautiful custom, finely tuned, precision made Kimber to the rigors of constant re-holstering, dirt, grime and wear of constant training? Maybe not. Fortunately the middle ground is full of quality proven duty type firearms in a variety of action types from multiple manufacturers. A good quality daily use firearm can be obtained for around $500-$800. You also need to consider the cost of ammunition when budgeting. As a rule of thumb, the larger the caliber the more expensive the ammunition.
  3. Size/Weight/Recoil/Caliber. Whenever we fire a gun the cartridge generates a force equal and opposite to the force being applied to the bullet. The bigger the Caliber the greater the force. This force is absorbed partially by the gun itself the rest is absorbed by us. The portion we absorb is called Felt Recoil. If we keep caliber the same, then reduce the weight/size of the gun, less force is absorbed by the gun due to its reduced mass. Therefore we must absorb more force, greater Felt Recoil. More recoil makes guns harder to control inhibiting fast follow up shots. Also smaller guns have shorter sightlines making them harder to shoot accurately and shorter barrels which reduce muzzle velocity/bullet energy.
  4. Double Action Revolver/Semi-Automatic. Both are effective Defensive Handguns with pros and cons. Revolvers are simple to use reliable and not prone to user induced malfunctions. They take some serious practice to shoot rapidly and accurately due to their heavy double action triggers. They generally hold between 4-8 rounds depending on frame size and caliber. With practice and a speed loader they can be reloaded reasonably quickly. Semi-Automatics are typically easier to shoot fast and accurately due to shorter lighter trigger pulls. They are however prone to user induced malfunctions and care must be taken when selecting Hollow Point ammunition as some are finicky about which brands they will feed reliably. They generally have a much greater ammunition capacity than revolvers (up to 17 or more) and are easier to reload quickly.
  5. Manufacturer. Who makes the gun you buy is important for several reasons. Warranty is important on a gun you will use hard and often. Availability of parts and ease of repair are also considerations. By staying with main stream manufacturers you will have less down time for a broken gun than if you bought that cool exotic hand cannon that has to be sent overseas for repair as nobody here has a clue how to fix it and even if they do it takes weeks to get parts.
  6. Concealed Carry Considerations.
  • Slim. Thin guns are easier to conceal so consider a single stack magazine for Semi-Autos. With Revolvers Reducing Cylinder capacity is a common way to slim down the gun.
  • Shorter. Most concealable firearms have shorter barrels and grips to aid in concealment.
  • Smooth. Ideally sights and controls should have rounded edges or be recessed to prevent snagging on clothing and gear.

When you have narrowed down your choices to three or four contenders go and rent them and shoot them. Far better to spend an extra $100 bucks trying them out, than find you hate that $800 gun you just bought.

In part 2 at the risk of hundreds of emails I will share some thoughts on caliber for Self-Defense.

Concealed Online Reviews – End the Debate: Revolver or Semi-Auto? Which Works Better for Concealed Carry?

There are 15 people right now at your local gun shop. Step in and ask them if you should concealed carry with a revolver or a semi-auto and you’ll get 15 different opinions.

Well here’s another opinion for you: To end the revolver vs. semi-auto debate, you need to consider your concealed carry needs, your shooting style, and a few other factors those 15 guys at your local range aren’t even thinking about.

concelaedonline- Concealed and Carry Classes Online 3

Sure, there are already 1,000 opinions out there on forums, blogs, and in magazines…

Isn’t it time to analyze your style, needs, and goals and come up with your own opinion? Keep reading to learn more…

Let’s Talk Reliability and Concealed Carry

If you’ve been reading about revolvers already you’ve heard quite a bit about “second strike capability.”

So, if you’re firing a revolver and you have a misfire, you can just pull the trigger again.

Revolvers allow you to make this second strike. Your trigger pull advances the next cartridge.

concealedonline carry classes 1

Die-hard proponents of revolvers for concealed carry will tell you “semi-automatics don’t have second strike capability.” You know what? It’s true. A few semi-automatics allow you to pull the trigger again to re-strike the same cartridge…but that’s not even the same, is it?

But here’s the thing…

You’re going to have to look hard to find a pistol you’re willing to actually buy for concealed carry that you can’t rely on.

Think about it! Out of all the brands you’ve been looking at…

Revolvers, semi-autos, Smith & Wesson, Glock, Taurus, Colt, the list goes on…

There are few pistols from major manufacturers available today that you can call “unreliable.”

On top of that, when  loaded with the ammo you’ll use in a life-or-death situation (that’s right, the premium stuff, not low-quality home-reloaded from the hobbyist down the street with second-rate powder), you’re very unlikely to experience failure.

When you pull the trigger, it’s likely your premium self-defense ammo will fire in any modern pistol. “Second strike capable” or not, reliability in this regard is a wash.

Now what’s out of the way, let’s talk about what’s really important…

Think Recoil, Not Reliability

So you pick a revolver because of reliability…

Now you have something else to face: Recoil.

When you fire a revolver, the hammer drops, the bullet leaves the barrel and nothing else moves. All of the force from the bullet you just fired needs to go somewhere. And it heads right back into your hands.

Heavy revolvers help reduce this recoil. Most of the revolvers you’ll concealed carry don’t (simply because they are smaller and lighter).

Semi-autos are built to dissipate the force of a bulleting being fired.

Some of the force from every bullet leaving the chamber is used to move the slide back. Pressure bleeds off and moves the barrel. The motion of the gun itself and the design of semi-automatics draw away the force and pressure of firing your pistol.

What does this mean?

Pick a caliber and a pistol weight and a semi-auto will feel like it recoils less.

When seconds matter and help is minutes away, you’ll want less recoil to keep your rounds on target.

Capacity is Another Consideration

This one is short…

You can fit more rounds in most semi-automatics.

Higher capacity without reloading (and faster reloading time) is paramount to nearly everything else in life or death situations.

You’ll be trained to carry concealed, you’ll be prepared to fire (hopefully), and even then, in most “must shoot situations” not all of your rounds will make it to target.

Studies show that most of the time simply having a weapon, firing a single round, and hitting your target just once will protect you and your family. Armed assiliants are rarely prepared for bystanders who are carrying concealed.

But at the end of the day would you rather be prepared to reload quickly? Armed with a magazine of 10 rounds you can reload in under 2 seconds? Or do you want to fire 5 or 6 and end up stuck reloading a revolver?

But What About Complexity?

Revolvers are easier to fire.

They are simple, with no-frills operation.

Put rounds in, close the cylinder, pull the trigger. Rinse and repeat.

Semi-automatic pistols have more steps. Insert mag, rack the slide, safety, shoot…

Revolver fans love simplicity. There’s less to go wrong and (importantly for some) fewer steps to “learn.”

But if you’re carrying concealed, you’re going to be training anyway, right?

How Do You Choose?

Here’s the bottom line…

Semi-Automatics give you more rounds, less recoil, and improved reloading time. Do you need to worry about duds and second strike capability? Maybe.

Deputy Sheriff Bob Beanblossom, rangemaster, gives instruction during the shooting portion of the Tipton Co. Handgun Permit class on March 30, 2013.

Are revolvers easier to operate? You bet.

At the end of the day you need to choose the concealed carry pistol YOU feel most comfortable with. That’s how we can all end the revolver vs. semi-auto debate.